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Assessment

Assessment and Evidence for Learning

Evidence for Learning has transformed how we are able to evidence, assess, review and plan for meeting the unique needs of our SEND learners.

It supports an Enquiry-based approach to education and provision, which allows ALL stakeholders in a child, young person or adult’s learning and development to quickly and easily gather photo and video evidence, linked to the individual’s learning goals as well as key skills frameworks. Observations can be annotated and tagged in an instant. What’s more, teachers can easily amend and add to these goals over time in order to respond to a learners’ ongoing needs and development.

All evidence gathered is automatically organised by the app and is readily available on-demand to anyone in the school. Stakeholders can search for and sort evidence by any attribute, and we use these features to be better informed during planning and moderation.

EfL has also transformed how parents/carers, external stakeholders and the learner themselves are engaged and involved in the entire learning process and journey – a multi-agency approach. Not only can photos, videos and notes be easily and securely shared by the school, but parents/carers can capture and submit their own photos, videos and notes to reflect the learner’s development and experiences at home and outside in the community. Invaluable collaboration and powerful at showing where learning and knowledge is beginning to be generalised.

Assessment

Assessment is individualised and tailored to the unique needs of every child within the SPT. To ensure progress is accurately monitored, EfL (Evidence for Learning) allows for the mark books to sit alongside the recorded evidence. Within PLGs (Personal Learning Goals), this allows progress to be monitored and quality assured on a wide-ranging set of targets with the same measure. We use a four-point measure of progress indicator across the entire SPT. These are: Emerging, Developing, Established, and Generalised. The SPT has high expectations of progress backed by clear evidence that demonstrates that targets are both appropriately set and focussed upon.

With English, Maths and other core subjects, the progress is measured against a seven-step scale which we call P-CAS (Pencalenick Cognitive Assessment Steps). These seven steps are linked with Blooms Taxonomy, a hieratical model used for classification of educational learning objectives into levels of complexity and specificity. Again, students are measured against these steps using the four main progress indicators. Below is an overview of what would be expected of students operating at each step:

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Subject Specific Steps Examples

Below are some of the seven steps we use for P-CAS with an overview of what these look like for different subjects.

English

Reading Comprehension

Step 1 Observe

This looks like reacting when you read or sing. Watching highly-motivating interactions.

Step 2 Interact

This looks like being involved. Turning pages, pointing and gesturing.

Step 3 Remember

This looks like following a story. Recognising some words, pictures and signs. Choosing a preference.

Step 4 Understand

This looks like matching a good selection of words and understanding key elements of a text.

Step 5 Apply

This looks like reading for themselves across a range of texts. Answer questions. Read using phonetic clues.

Step 6 Analyse

This looks like explaining choices, purposes of texts and meaning of unfamiliar words.

Step 7+ Evaluate

This looks like comparing information, ideas and opinions in different texts.

Reads critically to explore how a writer uses language to create meaning and effects.

Writing

Step 1 Observe

This looks like exploring a variety of textures and sensory items.

Step 2 Interact

This looks like improving motor control and mark making.

Step 3 Remember

This looks like copying and forming letters and individual words. Names objects.

Step 4 Understand

This looks like sequencing events and expressing ideas. Writes in lines.

Communicates appropriate word choices.

Step 5 Apply

This looks like writing in sentences for different purposes. Considers grammar and spelling.

Step 6 Analyse

This looks like planning and improving writing for different purposes.

Uses a range of vocabulary, punctuation, sentence types and grammar.

Step 7+ Evaluate

This looks like evaluating and comparing the purpose of the text they are writing.

Describing the layout and use of language confidently while identifying audience.

Speaking & Listening

Step 1 Observe

This looks like showing you are listening. More consistent responses to others.

Step 2 Interact

This looks like communicating simple phrases (such as hello) using words, signs or symbols.

Looks at person talking.

Step 3 Remember

This looks like following simple instructions. Using a simple series of words to describe or narrate.

Step 4 Understand

This looks like communicating ideas with short phrases or sentences.

Follows instructions containing key words.

Step 5 Apply

This looks like communicating with others more freely. Communicates feelings or viewpoint.

Asks questions.

Step 6 Analyse

This looks like using formal/informal language and asking clear questions appropriately in different contexts.

Considers tone and purpose.

Step 7+ Evaluate

This looks like using language which is effective, accurate and appropriate to context and audience.

Makes relevant and constructive contributions to move discussions forward.

Science

Step 1 Observe

Explore objects/ materials, use single word/ sign or symbol to name object, respond to what they see and hear.

Help carry out a simple test/ task/ activity.

Observe and starts taking part in an activity.

Step 2 Interact

Say what is happening and recognise familiar objects (see, touch, smell, hear and taste.)

Answer a simple question and answer 'What', 'Who', 'Where' ' questions.

Start to use trial and error, can do activity involving anticipation.

Step 3 Remember

Name changes they observed when asked directly

Tell people what they have done, can match/ sort things by property i.e. 'big'/'small'

Recognise risk and consider safety

Step 4 Understand

Use some of the equipment for measuring.

Identify obvious similarities and differences, can ask simple questions i.e. what they see or what might happen.

State what they found out through experiment.

Step 5 Apply

Choose and use simple equipment to take simple measurements.

Sort objects using more than one criteria and comment on similarities, differences and patterns when pointed out, share ideas.

Describe risks and say how to do activity safely.

Step 6 Analyse

Select and use equipment to answer questions.

Present ideas and explain what they have found out and make simple predictions.

Model safe working and check result against prediction.

Step 7+ Evaluate

Predict and record observations using a range of methods and equipment in a fair test.

Justify, draw conclusions, sort things into multiple groups, identify variables, using multiple data.

Evaluate how to find things out experimentally using a range of equipment and select solution to minimise risks.

PSHE

Step 1 Observe

Reacting to information and showing you are listening. More consistent responses to others linked with self-awareness.

Step 2 Interact

Responds to stimuli and different emotions. Shows curiosity.

Step 3 Remember

Recognise and name emotions, diversity and values, risks, self-care and what people do every day.

Step 4 Understand

Understand and identify differences and similarities of emotions, diversity and values, risks, self-care and what people do every day.

Step 5 Apply

Describe and give examples, using more than one viewpoint, of differences and similarities of emotions, diversity and values, risks, self-care and what people do in the wider community.

Step 6 Analyse

Explain and demonstrate, using a variety of viewpoints, emotions, diversity and values, risks, self-care and opportunities for people in the wider community.

Making simple predictions.

Step 7+ Evaluate

Predict and justify wide ranging viewpoints, giving evidence and illustrating emotions, diversity and values, risks, and self-care.

Simplify complex solutions, situations and strategies.

Religious Education

Step 1 Observe

Watch simple celebrations. Show interest.

Step 2 Interact

Join in simple celebrations. Handle and explore religious artefacts.

Step 3 Remember

Making Sense of Beliefs- Recall, name and talk about simple beliefs, stories and festivals.

Understanding the Impact- Observe, notice and recognise simple aspects of religion in their own communities.

Making Connections- Begin to find out about religions and beliefs.

Step 4 Understand

Making Sense of Beliefs- Identify beliefs, describe them simply, give examples and suggest meanings.

Understanding the Impact- Give examples of what difference it makes to believe in a religion.

Making Connections- Think, talk and ask questions about religion and belief for themselves.

Step 5 Apply

Making Sense of Beliefs- Describe beliefs and concepts, connecting them to texts, suggesting examples and meanings.

Understanding the Impact- Connect stories, teachings, concepts and texts with how religious people live, celebrate and worship.

Making Connections- Suggest answers to questions, including their own ideas, about the differences religion makes to life.

Step 6 Analyse

Making Sense of Beliefs- Explain and give meanings for core texts and beliefs, comparing different ideas.

Understanding the Impact- Use evidence and examples to show why beliefs make a difference to life.

Making Connections- Connect their own reflections and views to the religions and beliefs they study, developing insights.

Step 7+ Evaluate

Making Sense of Beliefs- Explain important beliefs reasonably, describing different interpretations.

Understanding the Impact- Use reasons and examples to show how and why beliefs and moral values are put into action today.

Making Connections- Respond reasonably to the challenges raised by religions and beliefs with coherent views of their own.